FORMS

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Level A Form

 

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The official Human Interaction Assessment Form

Authors: Katie Touhey Moore & Susan Barco

Virgina Aquarium and Marine Science Center

 

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REPORTS

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The 10 Year Prescott Program Report

 

pdfClick here to download9.82 MB

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The official Human Interaction Assessment Report

Authors: Katie Touhey Moore & Susan Barco

Virgina Aquarium and Marine Science Center

 

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TRAINING DOCS

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Speaking with the Public About Strandings:

A template for inclusion in stranding volunteer training materials

Authors: Robin Dunkin & David Casper

Long Marine Lab, U.C. Santa Cruz

 

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pinniped guide

Guide to Identification of Pinniped Skulls

Authors: California Academy of Sciences

 

 

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pinniped guide 2

Guide to Identification of Dead Pinnipeds

Authors: California Academy of Sciences

 

 

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Guide to Identification Neonatal Pinnipeds in California

Authors: California Academy of Sciences

 

 

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LINKS

mmradialogysm

Marine Mammal Radiology

A rich resource of CT scans and other imaging modalities for marine mammals.

Authors: Dr. Sophie Dennison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Published in Resources

Him or Her? Gender is one of the most important elements of the level A form and determining he or she is quite different in a cetacean than pinniped. In general, most cetaceans do not have the obvious secondary sexual characteristics such as the raised bony CREST that you find on the forehead in male California sea lions. Cetacean males also do not have a baculum, or bone in the penis, which is readily distinguishable even after extreme decomposition. Rather, body size tends to be the biggest difference between male and female cetaceans and often even this is not readily distinguishable. Thus, gender determination in cetaceans usually relies upon examination of the ventral body surface.

Published in Gender ID

In cetaceans, length is usually the first and main clue as to the relative age of an individual and this will of course be species specific. At the bottom of this page you can find standard lengths for various age classes for Atlantic harbor porpoises from the published literature.

Published in Age Determination

Preparing for sample collection ahead of time can save you a lot of effort during the necropsy. Sample collection is critical for collecting useful data that will later be used by the pathologist as well as researchers and others who may use the data you collect.

Published in Basic Response

When collecting standard weights and morphometric (physical) measurements from an animal standardization is key to good data collection. When you consider that thousands of people all over the United States and even across the globe collect these measurements, the only way they are useful is if standard techniques are used by all!

Published in Basic Response

Trying to determine the age of an animal can be difficult. There are certain features that can assist in this determination, however, many researchers will rely on straight length to place animals in a life history category (an age class).  At the bottom of this page you can find standard lengths for various age classes for California sea lions from the published literature. However, with experience you will be able to pick out many of the other features that will alert you to whether an animal is a neonate, an adult, or somewhere in between.

Published in Age Determination

He or She? Sometimes gender is easy to distinguish even at a distance and sometimes you have to get up close and examine the animal. In many pinnipeds there are a number of features that often make gender ID fairly straightforward even when the animal is rather decomposed. For example, adult male California sea lions have a bony ridge called a sagittal crest which gives them a very prominent forehead. This secondary sexual characteristic is only found in adult males and thus, can help you determine both age and sex at a distance.

Published in Gender ID

Transporting a carcass can be tricky business. Larger animals pose particular difficulties. Logistical issues that must be considered include safety of volunteers, staff, and the public as well as the location of the animal, the tidal schedule, and beach access.

Published in Basic Response
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